TheNewspaper.com: Driving Politics
Home >Police Enforcement > Tickets and Cash > Florida May Put Loud Stereo Tickets on Driving Record 
Print It Email It Tweet It

10/10/2009
Florida May Put Loud Stereo Tickets on Driving Record
Legislation proposed for the 2010 session in Florida would make turning up the stereo a moving violation.

Rep. Alan Hays
A member of the Florida House of Representatives wants to make driving with a loud stereo a crime on the same level as driving with an open container of alcohol. State Representative D. Alan Hays (R-Umatilla) last month introduced House Bill 137 which modifies an existing loud stereo statute to double the cost of fines and make the offense a moving violation.

Current Florida law makes it unlawful to drive with a stereo "plainly audible" from twenty-five feet away or that is "louder than necessary for the convenient hearing by persons inside the vehicle" when driving past a church, school or hospital. Law enforcement officers are exempt as are politicians who use loud soundmaking devices for "political purposes." The typical fine is $78 with no points.

HB 137 would impose three license points and boost the fine to $180 for a third offense. The addition of points will serve as a boon to insurance companies which will collect significantly higher premiums from ticket recipients. The industry has already rewarded Hays $16,650 in political contributions since his election in 2004, including support for his run for the state Senate in 2010.

Although state law already imposes a specific fine for loud stereos, several municipalities have written their own civil ordinances in order to impose harsher punishments including sixty days in jail, a $500 fine and the potential for thousands in impound fees. Passage of the Hays bill would allow these cities to add license points to the list.

View a copy of HB 137 in a 75k PDF file at the source link below.

Source: PDF File House Bill 137 (Florida Legislature, 9/22/2009)



Permanent Link for this item
Return to Front Page


Related News
Pennsylvania Appellate Court Revives Administrative Ticket Nightmare

Study Finds Car Seat, Seat Belt Laws Do Not Save Children

Study Suggests Emphasis On Speed Enforcement Is Misguided

Kansas Supreme Court Clears Man Charged With Stoplight Burnout

California Man Sues Traffic Court Over Conflict Of Interest




View Main Topics:

Get Email Updates
Subscribe with Google
Subscribe via RSS or E-Mail

Back To Front Page


Front Page | Get Updates | Site Map | News Archive | Search | RSS Feed
TheNewspaper.com: Driving politics
TheNewspaper.com