TheNewspaper.com: Driving Politics
Home >Police Enforcement > Tickets and Cash > South Carolina: Untrained Police Issue Radar Speeding Tickets 
Print It Email It Tweet It

12/24/2007
South Carolina: Untrained Police Issue Radar Speeding Tickets
Hundreds of police officers in South Carolina issue speeding tickets with laser and radar guns they are not certified to use.

South Carolina Highway Patrol
Police in several cities throughout the state of South Carolina use radar and laser speed measuring guns without any formal classroom training or certification. The Charleston Post and Courier newspaper confirmed that the speed trap cities of Cottageville, Hanahan, Harleyville, and Mount Pleasant all use uncertified officers to issue speeding citations that help generate thousands in revenue for the local budget. Mount Pleasant, for example, has a total of thirty-two officers who use the complex equipment without any certification.

Kandy Burdick, 64, decided to fight what she believed was an inaccurate and unjust radar ticket she received in Cottageville in October. Under oath, the police officer who stopped her admitted that he was uncertified. Burdick was cleared of the charge.

"It seems a little backward that I need a piece of paper that allows me to drive but he doesn't need a license to operate a device that says I'm driving too fast," Burdick told the Post and Courier.

Although the state operates a training academy that offers a free, three-day course in the proper methods of using the equipment to issue tickets, attendance is not required by law. Many departments do not send officers to the course because it would mean several days worth of potential ticketing would be lost.

Last year, Cottageville Police Chief Ray Taylor was caught on tape berating a police officer for his "poor performance" in issuing radar tickets.

"The main priority right now when you're driving is generating revenue," Taylor said on the tape.

Source: Operating under the radar (Charleston Post and Courier (SC), 12/23/2007)



Permanent Link for this item
Return to Front Page


Related News
Pennsylvania Appellate Court Revives Administrative Ticket Nightmare

Study Finds Car Seat, Seat Belt Laws Do Not Save Children

Study Suggests Emphasis On Speed Enforcement Is Misguided

Kansas Supreme Court Clears Man Charged With Stoplight Burnout

California Man Sues Traffic Court Over Conflict Of Interest




View Main Topics:

Get Email Updates
Subscribe with Google
Subscribe via RSS or E-Mail

Back To Front Page


Front Page | Get Updates | Site Map | News Archive | Search | RSS Feed
TheNewspaper.com: Driving politics
TheNewspaper.com