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2006 Year in Review
A list of the most viewed stories in 2006 on

2006 New Year, photo by Charles MillerThe following ten items were the most viewed stories last year on
  1. Federal Appeals Court: Driving With Money is a Crime
    In August, a federal appeals court ruled that merely driving with a large amount of cash was sufficient evidence for police to seize the money, even if there is no evidence that a crime has been committed.

  2. Police Roadblock Harassment Caught on Tape
    Last month, a motorist released a video of St. Louis County, Missouri police threatening "find a reason" to arrest him when he refused to discuss his personal travel plans at a roadblock.

  3. Meter Maid Arrested for Ticketing Cop
    In May, a meter maid gave a parking ticket to a Chicago, Illinois police officer. The officer retaliated by arresting her when she refused to void the citation.

  4. Speed Camera Tickets Non-Speeding Protester
    In January, annoyed by a defiant gesture, a UK speed camera issued a ticket to non-speeding driver.

  5. Tennessee Supreme Court Overturns ID Roadblocks
    In April, Tennessee's highest court found that the use of roadblocks to check identification papers, driving licenses and automobile registrations to be unconstitutional.

  6. Driver Responsibility Tax Surprises Out of State Motorist
    In February, a motorist discovered new laws allow Michigan, New Jersey, New York and Texas to tax drivers annually -- even if they live in another state -- simply because they received a speeding ticket.

  7. $180,000 Seized Car Over Squealing Tires
    In January, New Zealand Police seized a $180,000 Mercedes-Benz CLS 55 AMG without trial by claiming it "lost traction."

  8. Geico Charges Higher Insurance Rates for Blue Collar Workers
    In February, a study showed Geico charged janitors 70 percent more than it charges lawyers for car insurance in New Jersey. A later update showed the practice to be nationwide.

  9. Camera Mails Tickets to Noisy Cars
    In March, a new technology was revealed that allows police to mail automated tickets to cars with loud stereos and noisy exhausts.

  10. Ticket Quota Cover-up Continues with Pennsylvania State Police
    In August, a special report showed that Pennsylvania State Troopers were offered a monetary bounty in return for writing additional traffic tickets. Those who disagreed with the policy were punished for speaking out.