TheNewspaper.com: Driving Politics
Home >Camera Enforcement > Red Light Cameras > Turmoil in Two California Red Light Camera Programs 
Print It Email It Tweet It

12/5/2009
Turmoil in Two California Red Light Camera Programs
ATS dumps Santa Maria, California red light cameras while Santa Ana finally decides to comply with state law.

ATS pulls down camera
Red light cameras are shutting down temporarily and permanently in a pair of California cities. Santa Maria's program has ended for good, thanks to camera vendor American Traffic Solutions (ATS). ATS inherited the Santa Maria account from bankrupt vendor Nestor Traffic Systems in September and has now decided to pull out of the city because it was not earning enough revenue.

Although many jurisdictions claim that they are in full control of their red light camera programs, Santa Maria's experience demonstrates which party is truly in charge. A local resident who had challenged a photo citation had the case dismissed because the city no longer has any evidence of an alleged violation.

"The company that operates the city's red light photo enforcement system terminated its contract with the city unexpectedly," City Attorney Philip Sinco wrote in an email to the resident. "They have shut the system off and have repossessed equipment they provided us with that permitted us to prove up the violations in court. We are unable to prove up these violations now in light of their action."

All violations will be dismissed as a result. Santa Ana's attitude is less forgiving. Although the city has finally agreed to shut down its program for thirty days to comply with state law, it will continue to prosecute violations issued during the period when the city was operating in open defiance of several court rulings.

In August, Orange County Superior Court Commissioner Kenneth Schwartz declared the program in violation of a number of provisions of state law (view ruling). Instead of providing notice each time the city added photo ticketing to an intersection, as required by statute, Santa Ana made a single announcement in 2003 with the intention of moving cameras to new intersections within the city limits whenever a particular location failed to generate sufficient revenue.

The Schwartz ruling was far from unique. Appellate rulings throughout the state have consistently found municipal practices contrary to state law. In January, the warning issue had been raised and decided (view ruling). In February, the appellate division found Sacramento County's camera program had produced unreliable evidence (view ruling). Last December, the appellate division ruled "cost neutral" contracts in Fullerton were illegal (view ruling).

Schwartz has automatically thrown out any red light camera citation from Santa Ana brought before his court as a result, a move that finally forced the city to comply. Because Santa Ana is continuing to prosecute the citations, however, motorists must show up in person to have their $450 ticket dismissed.



Related News
Delaware Judge Denies Right To Appeal Photo Tickets

Louisiana Supreme Court Rejects Traffic Camera Challenge

Duke University Increases Control Over Red Light Camera Company

Top Redflex Exec Renews Push For Settlement Cash

Illinois: Lawsuit Challenges Red Light Camera Trap




View Main Topics:

Get Email Updates
Subscribe with Google
Subscribe via RSS or E-Mail

Back To Front Page


Front Page | Get Updates | Site Map | News Archive | Search | RSS Feed
TheNewspaper.com: Driving politics
TheNewspaper.com